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Secondly the RADAR was not very accurate. This was addressed by taking inputs from three RADARs and using a filter table to correlate the plots. Come on the talk a learn how the filter table worked. The Filter board is modelled on the one at Bentley Priory.
RAF Air Defence Radar Museum

A registered Charity No. 1058887

curator@radarmuseum.co.uk Contact Details Phone 01692 631485 email:
EARLY RADAR DEVELOPMENT The WW2 area looks at the development of Radar and how this helped to win the Battle of Britain. In 1935, in what is known as the “Daventry Experiment”, Watson-Watt demonstrated that radio waves could be used to detect Aircraft. Following the experiment the government funded the development of a Radar System which could be used to defend the United Kingdom. The system developed was the Chain Home system. In the WW2 room we have examples of the type of RADAR which would have been used. The RADAR had its limitations. Firstly, being a static RADAR, it was limited to how much area could be covered. This was addressed by putting the RADARs close together around the coast and also using the Royal Observer Corps to spot the aircraft after they had flown over the coast.
The pilot was often disoriented and only a compass for navigation they used the High Frequency Direction Finding System - Huff/Duff to help guide the pilot home. There were two parts to the system. The base station with a Radio and rotatable antenna and the plotting table.
On the Radar talk you will see how all these systems worked. You will also find out about Pip Squeak. The next part of the talk covers the advances made in Radar and the role played by RAF Neatishead.
After the position of the enemy aircraft has been determined the information is passed on the operations centre. In the WW2 area we have it set up as it was at Biggin Hill and have some of the original Artefacts from there. By using the Tote Board and side boards the status of all the squadrons can be tracked.
Secondly the RADAR was not very accurate. This was addressed by taking inputs from three RADARs and using a filter table to correlate the plots. Come on the talk a learn how the filter table worked. The Filter board is modelled on the one at Bentley Priory.
EARLY RADAR DEVELOPMENT The WW2 area looks at the development of Radar and how this helped to win the Battle of Britain. In 1935, in what is known as the “Daventry Experiment”, Watson-Watt demonstrated that radio waves could be used to detect Aircraft. Following the experiment the government funded the development of a Radar System which could be used to defend the United Kingdom. The system developed was the Chain Home system. In the WW2 room we have examples of the type of RADAR which would have been used. The RADAR had its limitations. Firstly, being a static RADAR, it was limited to how much area could be covered. This was addressed by putting the RADARs close together around the coast and also using the Royal Observer Corps to spot the aircraft after they had flown over the coast.
The pilot was often disoriented and only a compass for navigation they used the High Frequency Direction Finding System - Huff/Duff to help guide the pilot home. There were two parts to the system. The base station with a Radio and rotatable antenna and the plotting table.
On the Radar talk you will see how all these systems worked. You will also find out about Pip Squeak. The next part of the talk covers the advances made in Radar and the role played by RAF Neatishead.
curator@radarmuseum.co.uk Contact Details Phone 01692 631485 email:
After the position of the enemy aircraft has been determined the information is passed on the operations centre. In the 1940’s room we have it set up as it was at Biggin Hill and have some of the original Artefacts from there. By using the Tote Board and side boards the status of all the squadrons can be tracked
RAF Air Defence Radar Museum

A registered Charity No. 1058887